National Women’s Health Week: Healthy Steps You Can Take to Help You Conceive

When most women learn they are having a baby, they shift their diet toward healthier foods and whole grains. They also reduce (or eliminate) their exposure to toxins and chemicals. But did you know it is equally important to practice healthy eating, remain physically active and steer clear of substances that could affect your fertility before conception? Preparing your body before you become pregnant will give your baby the best start to life by providing an environment filled with the nutrients and vitamins they need to be healthy. Some of the most important growing happens in the first three months
Read More

National Infertility Awareness Week

No one ever told you how hard it might be to get pregnant. Throughout your young adult life, you likely took precautions to ensure you didn’t get pregnant before you were ready. And now? You’ve been trying to conceive for months that have stretched an entire calendar year. Infertility is more common than you may realize, affecting approximately one in eight couples in America. National Infertility Awareness Week (NIAW) aims to transform how the world views infertility and provide resolutions to the millions of Americans who are unable to conceive without assistance. How can infertility affect you? Infertility can come
Read More

National Endometriosis Awareness Month

March is National Endometriosis Awareness Month. Endometriosis is a disorder in which tissue that normally lines the uterus grows outside of the uterus. Misplaced tissue can also be found on the ovaries, fallopian tubes or intestines. This disorder affects approximately five million U.S. women (6 to 7 percent of the U.S. population), of those, 30 to 40 percent are infertile. Unfortunately, this disorder is often hidden and unrecognized, even by those it affects. This month, the Center for Reproductive Medicine aims to help promote a greater awareness and understanding of endometriosis as a real and often debilitating condition. This disorder
Read More

Common Misconceptions About Infertility

You remember the moment you decided to start a family, whether it was a conversation with your loved one or that poignant moment when you stopped using birth control. Like so many women, you assumed once you stopped all forms of birth control, you would easily get pregnant. Then, after 12 consecutive months of trying to conceive, you are faced with another reality: infertility. Couples are typically diagnosed with infertility after a woman has been unable to become pregnant after 12 consecutive months. If you are interested in exploring fertility treatments, your primary care physician will refer you to a
Read More

How Folic Acid Can Help You

When the thought of having a baby is on the horizon, folic acid is vital to a healthy pregnancy. Think of folic acid as the “superpower” of B-vitamins. Not only is it necessary for cell growth, it’s known to help prevent certain birth defects. According to the National Birth Defects Prevention Network, if taken before and during early pregnancy, folic acid can prevent up to 70% of some serious birth defects of the brain and spine. How much folic acid do you need? Even if you’re not planning to start a family, folic acid is vital to helping the body
Read More

Crohn’s Disease and Your Fertility

Crohn’s disease, a chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), can cause abdominal pain, severe diarrhea, fatigue, weight loss and malnutrition. Crohn’s is most often diagnosed between the ages of 15 and 25 — the peak of a woman’s fertility. Fertility and Crohn’s disease Many women with Crohn’s who want to become pregnant are concerned about how their IBD will impact pregnancy. The cases in which IBD can negatively affect fertility include: Inflammation in the colon, fallopian tubes or ovaries Scarring from surgical procedures such as a total colectomy (surgical removal of the large intestine) Crohn’s disease symptoms, like fever, anemia and
Read More

Testing for Infertility

Infertility affects approximately one out of every six couples, many of which have more than one cause of infertility. When a couple has been unsuccessful at achieving pregnancy after one year, both partners should undergo comprehensive physical and medical assessments. Testing for female infertility The cause of female infertility can be difficult to diagnose, but once the underlying cause is found, many advanced treatments are available. There is an array of diagnostic tests and workups that may be used to find the source of infertility in a woman: Urine or blood tests to check for infections or hormone problems Abdominal laparoscopy to view
Read More

The Effects of Cancer Treatment on Your Fertility

During the month of October, the nation’s focus turns to Breast Cancer Awareness. For the team at Center for Reproductive Medicine, it brings another critical topic to mind: women who want to start a family, but are facing a cancer diagnosis, have important and complex decisions to make. No matter the type of cancer, timing an effective treatment and preserving fertility is a significant challenge. Cancer treatments and infertility Chemotherapy (chemo) drugs carry the highest risk of damaging eggs and/or affecting fertility. The intensity of the risk depends on your age, the type of chemo drug and its dosage. Targeted
Read More

Proper Nutrition for Conception

When it comes to incidence of infertility, approximately 40 percent is due to male factors, another 40 percent is due to female factors, and the remaining 20 percent is due to both male and female factors. Check out these tips to help with proper nutrition for conception to boost your fertility. Nutrition for conception Zinc. Oysters contain a high level of zinc. Maintaining a daily diet of 15mg a day can help improve semen and testosterone production in men and ovulation and fertility in women. Folic Acid and Vitamin B. Leafy, dark green vegetables, citrus, nuts and whole grains are rich in
Read More

10 Fertility Terms You Need to Know

Did you know that approximately 15% of couples around the world have difficulty conceiving? If you have been trying to conceive for over 12 months, your doctor may refer you to a reproductive specialist. Here are 10 fertility terms you need to know to help you at your upcoming appointments: Reproductive Endocrinologist An infertility specialist and physician with highly specialized training in all forms of advanced reproductive techniques. Hysterosalpingogram (HSG) This is an x-ray procedure used to determine if your fallopian tubes are open and the inside of the uterus is normal. The duration of this test lasts only a
Read More